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20130106
20130114
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that their soul is in dire danger, that they are headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. from
made the masters work on religion and i looked at traditional societies. what lessons did you learn about the role of spirituality in the societies we might be missing? >> religion has different functions in traditional societies. from the function that it functions that it has in modern society. traditional societies use religion a lot more explanation, now science provided the explanations of why there's tides and why the sun seems to go across the sky. so there's a function of religion that has become lost with time. religion still has its function of offering comfort, of helping deal with anxiety. religion used to have a function of teaching us to obey the king or obey the president. the reasons that we obey the president today are not because of religion but because of the rule of law. >> interesting. professor jared diamond, thank you so much for all of that. >> you are welcome. >>> and up next, coughing, sneezing and wheezing. the flu outbreak infecting the nation. >> excuse me. >> how facebook -- well timed there, s.e. facebook helping some fight back. we'll explain it next.
of the 20th century. he did not in the end adopt some foreign religion. he adopted his own religion, that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamist convert to what is to them a foreign religion, but rather an islam of their own ancestors, one and poisoned by the extremism we associate with wahhabism and al qaeda. the problem for us is that christianity was very much part of western culture and something that we were knowledgeable about and suited to fight over. islam is different. is hard for our government to be effective with the struggle of that religion. i just want to also note by the way ,-com,-com ma because charlie mentioned an awful, the journey. "witness" was one of the greatest autobiographical groups on extremism. perhaps one of the greatest novels about it. and they had great political impacts in part because they were great literary works, works of art. there are some islamic works about breaking with extremism. the islamist by ed hussein, radical i -- but i don't think there are any such works that are great works of art scene from the point
was put in there. remember, this is the second amendment, second only after free speech, religion. the founders took this very, very seriously. this is not an amendment to guarantee the right to hunt squirrels. so it's very important that we have an adult conversation, stop ranting and raving over gun violence. of course, we all hate gun violence. but for example, let us ask the question, why have we seen the mass shootings that we have? it is not the law-abiding citizens, using their guns. in fact, there is a very close connection with psychiatric drugs. i have a forbes column i wrote that should be appearing very soon, it draws the connection between the presence of these psychiatric drug, people -- those so-called lone wolf shooters, especially the young people who are on these psychiatric drugs, anti-depressants or in withdrawal from them, why isn't congress holding hearings on this? rather than pulling the nra do into these meetings and brow-beating them over exercising a right that the founders guaranteed, why not invite the pharmaceutical companies into capitol hill and see
as well. we'll talk to her next. >> and later when asked about their religion, how many members of the new congress checked the box none. the answer may surprise you. stay tuned. this is msnbc, the place for politics. >>> the single biggest issue we have right now is the massive, massive debt hanging over the heads of our children and grandchildren. we need to address it, and the american people elected divided government. they expect us to deal with the problems, even though they are hard to deal with when you have different points of view. >> republican leader mitch mcconnell there trying to put the fiscal cliff in his rear view mirror but some on the right may not let him. mcconnell is now one of several republicans being targeted by tea party groups who say they are ready to take on the establish nntment again in 2014. with me is amy creamer, head of the tea party express. >> good to see you. >> president for the americans with prosperity, tim phillips said in part, quote, lawmakers will not be judged solely on how they voted on the fiscal cliff, but it is a big vote to get wrong. obvi
positive news. thanks for bringing it to us, nick. >> thank you. >>> let's talk politics and religion now. you probably heard that there are more women and my norities in the new congress. but it's last religiously diverse congress a new survey by the pew forum says the freshman class is more diverse than the congress it replaced. the survey points out only 48% of the new class identifies as protestant, down from 58% the previous class. this session will see its first hindu, first buddhist in the senate and the first member of either house to list their religion as none. >>> well, for many, the devastation from superstorm sandy is still very much a part of their daily lives, ever since that storm hit, st. paul's united methodist church in bay head, new jersey, has been serving meals to hundreds of people every day. for those who homes have been damaged or destroyed, the comfort blow slided by that church, how can you put it? it has been a real blessing. >> freezing out and they just had a couple water bottles and coffee set up. came in the next day need buffet of like penny vodka and bake
. host: democratic caller. caller: republicans always find their religion when measures are needed that do not affect areas that are concerned by them. when katrina relief was needed, the federal debt and deficit was ballooning, and we did not see anybody spending up there, and we needed of since 36 offsets all the way up until the president got into -- needed offsets' until this president got into office. everything was already in place under republican-led spending, but now they have found religion and want to cut these programs said affect people that did not cause the economic downturn or the ballooning of the debt. they always find religion what it does not affect them. guest: let me just be clear that the club for growth has had a clear position on this. we are accused of being uncarin g let it comes to disaster relief, and it is not fair, because we want people to get the relief they need to love but we believe it should be paid for. the government should set money aside for emergencies. we can predict there will be emergencies every year. history has done that they will hel
of freedom of religion and separation of church and state. >> roger williams was the founder of rhode island, the founder of providence, and also a founder of the first baptist church in america. williams was going -- born in london. his birth records were burned up in the great london fire of 1666. he became a chaplain for one of the chiefs. because he was a puritan and the church was cracking down and putting his people in jail, he fled england. he arrived in boston in february. he believed the state had no role to play in religion. this was an absolutely radical idea at his time. every country in europe had a state church, so did massachusetts and the plymouth colony. they all had their own state- supported churches. the taxes of the people paid for the ministers and the buildings. you had to go to church or they would come and get you and fine you. williams said the state has no role whatsoever to play in religion. eventually, he was put on trial there and convicted of sedition and heresy and was going to be shipped back to england where he probably would have died. before they could exe
it's not -- football has nothing to do with it, it's a disgrace. >> let me ask you, in my religion, it's good to suffer some penance in admission of guilt, and then you move on. but when you try to cover something up and you don't confess or accept punishment for it, it stays with you. why doesn't penn state want to get this over with, take their punishment and penalty and get in the huddle and figure out the future? why do they want to go back at this thing when everybody knows they were guilty? >> well, i think penn state probably does want to continue on and get this behind them. and i think it needs to be pointed out this is governor corbett acting independent of penn state. even though he has sat on the board of trustees. listen, chris. i share the skepticism of buzz s bying bissinger about the acts. he has taken a thumping in the polls personally. this litigation might be popular with litigations. one of the reason he's taken such a hurt is people look at him and wonder why as attorney general it took so long for him to move on sandusky. why when he had one credible reporter
in a democracy and say, now we will fix the problems. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic clans are all part of that. you work with the system. i talked about alliances. that is what alliances are important. you work with in those systems. to influence change, affect change. there's so many things going on in the world today that are disgusting, despicable, that we hate. sudan is a good example. we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping change that, people who want to change it. we have limitations. all powers, all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand ho. host: chuck hagel. then-senator barack obama and chuck hagel traveling to the middle east. hagel co talks about the limits of power. guest: one of the conditions that president obama and his team said, a lot of demands and expectations around the world. a lot of challenges. america's role is to not challenge the foes, but to be dependable for the allies. i think one of the real challenges is when you think strategically. when you h
to bear arms in this country and believe it is as core to them as freedom of speech or freedom of religion. i think the laws that are on the books now would not have kept someone like my father from having a gun. we have real issues on mental health that have to be addressed. we are not seeing money put into programs on the books. but i don't understand why anybody needs an assault weapon in this country. i hope that everybody will come to a table. otherwise people are going to go to their corners and fight not seeing what we need to see get done. >> when you see a movement to restrict gun ownership rights, the inevitable outcome is gun sales, magazine sales, ammo sales guthrough the roof. it is the polar opposite intention of what people on debbie's side. argument want to see. >> we saw this before president obam was elected, when hadt looked like he was going to be elected in 2008 and the time period between the inauguration, you see the big jump in gun sales. there has been some degree of... too much concern on the part of gun owners and people said, the president's going to take away a
among christians when it comes to gun control. i mean, a public religion institute survey which of taken before the newtown shooting showed that white evangelical protestants were less likely to favor tighter gun laws than catholics. white mainline protestants are religiously unaffiliated americans. why do you think that is? >> thank you for that question. i mean, i think that's a wonderful question. we should not be surprised that many of our people of faith in this country who are all americans, are very much passionate about the second amendment and gun rights. at the same time, we should not -- we should also not be surprised that there are just as many people of faith if not more who are all in favor of common sense gun laws and promoting a culture of peace and healing in our communities. and i believe that it is our time and our moment to look within ourselves and the principles of our faith to unite our country around a common moral imperative to address the gun violence that is in our country. even to those statistics that you've just lifted up, interestingly enough, the national
and the freedom of religion. he is very much showing at this point why he is different and why his thinking is different and why rhode island is different from massachusetts, and the other colonies to the north. he was creating a land where people could come, could worship as they chose, and would always be protected by the civil law. roger williams, while he was a member of the clergy, was also incredible trained and learned in civil law and actually worked for circle in the british parliament. and we see a lot of his ideas of civil law in preparation of church and state. articulated in text like this but this did not of course sit well with england or with massachusetts. by an actor british parliament, all of the copies of this book were set to be burned. likely not all of them were. this copy was not an we're able to show that the people today. this didn't go unnoticed by people here in the colony. this next book has a contemporary binding, was a response to "the bloody tenent." the response, "the bloody tenent" made white in the blood of the land is response high cotton. it comes just a
governments. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic, are all part of that. i talked about alliances. that is why alliances are important. you work within those systems. to effect change and influence change. there are some things going on in the world today that are disgusting, that are despicable, that we hate. but we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping the people who want to change it. we have limitations. and great powers run into very difficult times when they do not recognize that they too have limitations to their power. all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand this. host: as senator chuck hagel, in his speech, and two years ago -- as you hear the words he talks about the limits of power. that echoed what the president said that in 2008 when he was running for the white house. guest: i think that is right. i think one of the conditions that president obama and his team -- a lot of demands and expectations of rumba world and a lot of challenges. america's role is not just to k
, in mythical narrative's, whether it is creationism, or the fact that muslims are a satanic religion. you cannot rationally argue with people who think the earth was created 6000 years ago and adam-and-eve used to ride on the backs of dinosaurs. the only thing you can do is reintegrate them into the economy. that is what frightens me. when you fall to that level of desperation, and this is exactly what tore apart yugoslavia with these ethnic, nationalist identities. there becomes an inability to communicate. a year ago we had several hundred white guys dressed in confederate uniforms margin to montgomery. half of that city is black. to carry out a re-enactment of the inauguration of jefferson davis. it cannot carry out a dialogue. that is what frightens me. we have powerful movements that celebrate the gun culture, the language of violence, that demonize the marginal and the week, whether it is african-americans, homosexuals, women, liberals. i see that breakdown occurring because of the economic disintegration, and having lived through it in places like yugoslavia, the rational argument
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)